On The Ice, At Last!

By Lindsay Berkhout (University of Chicago Astronomy and Astrophyics Major)

1/26/18

On the LC-130 flight to McMurdo Station.

Per the usual drill, we woke up for a 5:45 AM shuttle to the CDC, hoping today would be the day we flew. We were bumped off our 9:00 am flight, but given seats on the next flight out at 2:00 pm. After an anxious few hours of waiting, we went through security and were finally on a plane to McMurdo! We flew for around 8 hours on the LC-130 plane.  After about five hours blocks of ice could be seen floating in the sea, after about six hours ice flows and icebergs appeared.

After about five hours flying south, icebergs appeared in the sea.

And short while after we were over the Antarctic continent.

Approaching the continent of Antarctica.

During the flight some of us were invited to the flight deck. We landed and loaded up onto “Ivan” the Terra Bus for a half hour ride into town. We were dropped off at the Chalet for an in-brief and then we collected our checked bags at midnight. Then I promptly turned in for the night after a long day of flying.

1/27/18

The next morning we woke up for a meeting and tour of the Crary Lab, where most of the science offices are housed. In the afternoon, we took a walk down to Hut Point Peninsula, to have a look at Discovery Hut.

Discovery Hut, built by Robert Scott’s expedition in 1902.

The hut was build by Scott in 1902, during the Discovery mission, and was used for shelter on a few later missions. We couldn’t go inside, but we got a good view of the items left outside, including a seal carcass that was still there after all the years, and got a look through the windows. Because a shipping vessel was docked in town, we had to take the long way to the hut, so on our way we searched for some wildlife.

At Hut Point on Ross Island at McMurdo Station.

Our search for penguins was in vain, but we did see some skua and skua chicks. Skua are large, aggressive brown birds, and under protection from the Antarctic treaty, you cannot disturb them in any way (even if they disturb you). This happened to us on our walk as 3 different skua managed to block all our paths down to the hut, and we had to try to creep quietly past without disturbing them. We also saw a few seals, one in the far off distance sleeping, and briefly one in the water near Hut Point. 

1/28/18

Today was our last scheduled day in McMurdo, so after a good night’s rest and some breakfast, we decided to summit Observation Hill.

Observation Hill, our destination for today. Volcanic rocks and sand are everywhere around the station.

After a hike up the rocks, we were privy to incredible views over McMurdo and the ice shelf, as well as a look at Mt. Discovery and Mt. Erebus.

McMurdo Station from Obs Hill.

In the afternoon, we took a shuttle over to Scott Base, the Kiwi Antarctic station a few minutes from McMurdo. We spent some time walking around the store there and admiring the seals sleeping on the ice all around Scott Base. 

 

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